Transferring Files from SD Card to Mac 

by on August 31, 2007

Q: I would like to get some music off my SD Memory Card. When I try to get the music off using iPhoto it only tells me about the pictures not the music. So is there anyway I can get the music off the SD Memory Card using my OS X?

A: The most efficient way to remove files other than photos from your SD card would be by using a memory card reader. There are a wide variety of Mac compatible memory card readers available which will allow you to mount your memory card in OS X as though it were an external hard drive. Once the card is mounted, you can browse it like any other folder in OS X and copy the files you are looking for directly to your hard drive. Using a memory card reader will allow you to transfer files to your hard drive much quicker than if you were attempting to transfer them through the camera or using third party software.

 
 

Missing OCX File 

by on August 30, 2007

Q: On my Dell desktop, after it goes into sleep mode, when I go back to work with it a message appears. The Flashfox.ocx is not available. What is this and how can I get it erased?

A: After some searching I was unable to find any information on a file named “Flashfox.ocx.” Recheck the name of the .ocx file that your system cannot find, and search for it on OcxDump.com. This site is a repository of Windows ocx files. Once you have found and downloaded the correct replacement ocx file, you can visit the OcxDump Forums to get assistance on tracking down and restoring the file.

 
 

Creating Backups with a My Book World NAS 

by on August 29, 2007

An Into Tomorrow listener submitted the following question!

Q: I have a Dell desktop running Windows XP home edition. I also have a My Book World 500 GB external hard drive. I know how to run a backup and I know how to copy individual folders to the external hard drive. Can I copy my whole hard drive by itself to the external hard drive? If so, how do you do it?

A: It is definitely possible to back up your entire hard drive to your My Book World Network Attached Storage (NAS) device. According to the Western Digital site, your drive ships with a version of the Retrospect software tailored specifically for use with your drive. Retrospect is a well-regarded application used to create scheduled backups of your hard drive. Follow the directions provided with your drive to register it and to install and configure the Retrospect software. It will allow you to configure a backup of specific folders or entire drives on your system, and it will also allow you to schedule differential backups which just copy files and folders that have changed since the original backup.

 
 

Reduced Speed Over USB 

by on August 29, 2007

Q: I purchased a pre-owned Dell laptop with Windows XP and when I plug in my Epson Stylus Photo printer in I get a message saying that it will run at reduced speed because I don’t have a high speed USB host. I have gone to the device manager and there is a question mark on the device to mark it as unknown. I have followed the directions in the hardware troubleshooter to try to add it but I am unable to find the driver. Can you please help?

A: If your PC has USB 2.0 ports (check the documentation before assuming it does), it will give you messages about reduced transfer speeds if your USB controller is not recognized as being USB 2.0. You must go to the Dell web site and get the proper USB driver for your laptop. Uninstall the old driver and make sure that you install the correct USB driver rather than installing a generic or Windows USB driver. If you cannot find the newest USB 2.0 drivers from the Dell site, contact Dell’s technical support via email and ask them to send you the link to the USB controller drivers that you should be using on your laptop. Once the correct driver is installed, your PCs USB drives should be recognized as USB 2.0. You should be able to plug in the printer and not receive messages about reduced transfer speeds.

 
 

PC Backup Options 

by on August 28, 2007

Q: My computer is sick and needs to be taken for repair. I want to copy my hard drive to a back up. How can I do that?

A: The most efficient way to backup your hard drive would be to copy its contents to another drive. If you have an external USB hard drive, you can plug it into your PC and use an application like TeraCopy or Syncback SE to copy the contents of your hard drive to the external USB drive. Both of these applications will ensure that a healthy copy of your files is placed on the destination drive.

If you do not have an external hard drive, but you do have a CD or DVD burner, you may choose to burn copies of your data to CD or DVD. If you have a large amount of data, it may take a lot of discs and a long period of time to finish your backup. If your PC has a second hard drive with enough space to accommodate a backup of your files, you may also choose to copy your files to that drive. Just make sure that you instruct the people who will be repairing your PC not to wipe the data from that drive.

Alternatively, some repair companies also provide backup services. Before you drop off your PC for repair, you should ask if they will be able to backup your hard drive before attempting any repairs or maintenance. There may be an additional cost, but it could be less expensive and less time consuming than your other options. If your PC cannot boot into Windows, having the repair company back up your data may be necessary.

 
 

GPS for the Palm Lifedrive 

by on August 27, 2007

An Into Tomorrow listener submitted the following question!

Q: I have a Palm Lifedrive and I would like to know if I can add software or upgrade it to have the capability of a GPS. It would also be great if it could handle voice commands.

A: There are a wide variety of Bluetooth enabled GPS receivers on the market which can be easily paired with the Palm Lifedrive. All of them have different map systems, software, and features. You will need to do additional research to determine which system is easy for you to use. pdaBuzz.com has a review of Mobile Crossing Bluetooth GPS which mentions use with the Lifedrive. It also warns that the GPS should be the only device paired with the Lifedrive due to limitations in Palm’s implementation of Bluetooth. The Garmin Mobile 10 for PDAs is also compatible with PDAs including the Lifedrive.

 
 

Deleting History in Browsers 

by on August 27, 2007

Q: I entered some secret/personal information into a friend’s web browser and it saved the data in the form. How do I go about removing this information from the form before they find it?

A: The best way to get rid of any traces of this code (namely from web forms) would be to follow the instructions in our tutorial Delete browser history. If you follow the instructions you should be able to delete any traces of the code, which might be in the browser history, forms, and drop downs with saved information from web forms.

 
 

Changing Font Size in Web Browsers 

by on August 26, 2007

Q: The font on web pages has changed and now some of them are so small that I cannot read them. I do not remember doing anything different or changing anything, please help!

A: Sometimes the sizes of display fonts in your web browser are changed accidentally by a combination of keystrokes. There are two ways to change the size of fonts in Internet Explorer. If you click on Page > Text Size then you can choose the size you are most comfortable using. Medium is the default font size setting. You can also change the font size by holding down the Control key and clicking + or – to increase or decrease size respectfully.

If you use Firefox, you can change the font size by clicking on View > Text Size and choose Increase or Decrease. Like in Internet Explorer, you can also change the font size by holding down the Control key and clicking + or –.

 
 

What Type of Drive Enclosure Do I Need? 

by on August 25, 2007

Q: My wife’s HP laptop no longer boots, we cannot even even get BIOS screen. How do I know what kind of USB hard drive case to buy for her hard drive?

A: The type of hard drive enclosure you need to buy for your wife’s laptop hard drive will be determined by the drive’s interface. Laptops generally use 2.5″ hard drives, but there are two different interface types: IDE and eSATA. You will need to refer to the laptop’s documentation to determine what type of interface the hard drive has. Once you have that information, there are many drive enclosures you can choose from. Make sure to choose an enclosure that has the features you need. If you are unsure of the quality of a specific drive enclosure, search the web for reviews from other users. Once you pick an enclosure and purchase it, follow the installation instructions that come with it.

 
 

Using NAS Device as a Mainframe 

by on August 24, 2007

Q: Is there a way to use a NAS device with FTP as a mini mainframe? I want to be able to access a program and create files while on a remote computer that does not have the program and ability to share the files?

A: In order to find out if your NAS (Network-Attached Storage) has the capacity to perform the work of a mainframe, you would need to contact the device manufacturer’s technical support group. Quite a few routers and NAS devices have software on them that allows them to act as FTP or web servers. They do not, however, have a lot of processing power, so it is doubtful that many of them would be able to act as a mainframe. The manufacturer’s technical support department will be able to tell you if their device will support the mainframe functionality that you need. They will also be able to tell you whether or not using the device in that manner is something that they can provide support for.